Measuring Child Well-Being at the Neighborhood Level

Measuring Child Well-Being at the Neighborhood Level

On October 17, 2012, a panel of experts met to discuss community-based organizations and outcomes data at an event hosted by Chapin Hall. Community-based organizations require reliable and interpretable data in order to improve services. The need for t...

Summary

On October 17, 2012, a panel of experts met to discuss community-based organizations and outcomes data at an event hosted by Chapin Hall.

Community-based organizations require reliable and interpretable data in order to improve services. The need for this has increased as government and foundations require more information about the outcomes of services for children and their families. At the same time, more and more data are becoming available. However, much of it is difficult to read and is fragmented across many organizations at the city, county, state, and federal levels. For example, there is more complex Census data available, but it is challenging to access and understand. Additionally, having greater access to other sources of data on the web presents community-based organizations with much information, but, without dependable analysis, little wisdom. Making sense of a seemingly overwhelming supply of data is critical for effective decision making by policymakers and practitioners invested in child well-being.

This forum discussed the challenges community-based organizations face in accessing data and potential strategies for addressing these challenges.

Panel:

Robert Goerge, Senior Research Fellow, Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Alaina Harkness, Program Officer for Community and Economic Development in US Programs, The MacArthur Foundation

Chris Brown, Director, New Communities Program, LISC Chicago

Nancy Ronquillo, President and Chief Executive Officer, Children’s Home + Aid

Moderator:

Matthew Stagner, Executive Director, Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Learn more about Chapin Hall at chapinhall.org

Details

Duration:
1 hour, 30 minutes, 48 seconds
Recorded:
October 17, 2012
Published: November 16, 2012