Videos

Women and Children’s Health: Marcia Inhorn

On November 10, 2012, the University of Chicago Center hosted the Conference on Women and Children's Health in the Middle East, focused on the status of health and the delivery of health care services for women and children. The conference drew experts...

The Power of Ideas: Milton Friedman and Chicago Economics

Milton Friedman was one of the greatest economists of the 20th century. His continuing influence results from the power of his ideas—ideas built on the twin pillars of sound economic theory and careful empirical analysis. We invite you to join Univer...

UChicago creates new ways for students to explore entrepreneurship

  Jerry Huang, Assistant Director for Entrepreneurship in Career Advancement, discusses new avenues and resources for students who are interested in starting their own business or pursuing innovative career paths. Opportunitites include the College Ne...

A Reading by Joshuah Bearman

Los Angeles-based writer Joshuah Bearman gave a reading at Midway Studios on November 8, 2012. Bearman has written for LA Weekly, Rolling Stone, Wired, Harper's, and McSweeneys, and he is a contributor to the radio program This American Life...

Research Computing: Transforming Science and Scholarship

On a November 8, 2012, panel, UChicago scientists and scholars and IBM experts discuss how high performance computing is transforming academic research.   Learn more about join speaker series at nationallabs.uchicago.edu/page/speaker-series  

The University of Chicago's "Archaic Mark": A Remarkable Manuscript Treasure or a Modern-Day Counterfeit?

The Library Society presents Divinity School Dean Margaret Mitchell explaining the remarkable story of "Archaic Mark," one of the biblical manuscripts in the University of Chicago's Goodspeed Manuscript Collection, and the team efforts required to ...

Mark Philip Bradley - The United States and the 1940s Global Human Rights Imagination presented by The University of Chicago Center in Beijing

Mark Philip Bradley asks: Did human rights, a language rarely used in the first half of the twentieth century, become believable in the aftermath of the Second World War?