Prof. Karin Krause on Using Images to Teach Religion | The Craft of Teaching

Prof. Karin Krause on Using Images to Teach Religion | The Craft of Teaching

Prof. Karin Krause on Using Images to Teach Religion [Arts of Teaching] The range of resources and strategies with which we might engage in the teaching and learning of “religion” is virtually endless, shifting with different construals of the fi...

Summary

Prof. Karin Krause on Using Images to Teach Religion [Arts of Teaching]

The range of resources and strategies with which we might engage in the teaching and learning of “religion” is virtually endless, shifting with different construals of the field and commitments to different learning goals. In this new Craft of Teaching series, “Using X to Teach Religion,” members of the Divinity School faculty are invited to lead Arts of Teaching workshops combining a short presentation on the merits and limits of a particular type of resource they emphasize in their courses with close consideration and group workshopping of the associated course-design and active pedagogical decisions that need to be made.

In this inaugural edition of the series, Prof. Karin Krause leads the conversation on “Using Images to Teach Religion.” Through history and across civilizations, images communicate ideas, address emotions, and arouse both devotion and criticism in ways different than texts do, ways that are often overlooked or translated into textual analogues. Bringing images into the religious studies classroom can elicit valuable attention to the extra-discursive dimensions of religious imagination, communication, and commitment, while forming the basis for productive cross-cultural comparison.

The Craft of Teaching (CoT) is the Divinity School's program of pedagogical development for its graduate students, dedicated to preparing a new generation of accomplished educators in the field of religious studies.  We bring together Divinity School faculty, current students, and an extensive alumni network of decorated teachers to share our craft and to advance critical reflection on religious studies pedagogy

Details

Duration:
1 hour, 27 minutes, 16 seconds
Published: March 1, 2016