Fragmentation and Cybercascades

The ability to personalize your own news page--to create, in the words of MIT's Nicholas Negroponte, the 'Daily Me'--is often hailed as one of the great benefits of the World Wide Web. In cyberspace, consumers can filter out the news that doesn't inter...

Summary

The ability to personalize your own news page--to create, in the words of MIT's Nicholas Negroponte, the 'Daily Me'--is often hailed as one of the great benefits of the World Wide Web. In cyberspace, consumers can filter out the news that doesn't interest them, as well as the points of view with which they don't agree. University of Chicago law professor Cass Sunstein sees a dark side to this newfound freedom of choice: a fragmented communications market that produces an increasingly polarized society. In an excerpt from his book, Republic.com, Sunstein probes the ideological echo chamber that can be created by popular Web features like chat rooms, messages boards and the Daily Me. Copyright 2001 Princeton University Press

Details

Recorded:
March 1, 2006
Published: March 1, 2006
Series: